Analysis of the poem ‘A Prince From Western Libya’

A Prince From Western Libya by Constantine P. Cavafy Aristomenis, son of Menelaos,the Prince from Western Libya,was generally liked in Alexandriaduring the ten days he spent there.In keeping with his name, his dress was also suitably Greek.He received honours gladly,but he didn’t solicit them; he was unassuming.He bought Greek books,especially history and philosophy.Above all he was a man of few words.It got around that he … Continue reading Analysis of the poem ‘A Prince From Western Libya’

The lure of the Incomplete, the Imperfect and the Fragmented in Art

Until mid-19th century, an unfinished artwork was unacceptable for both aesthetic and philosophical reasons. A result of this tendency was that collectors of ancient art (mainly Greek and Roman) would dare restore sculptures by adding missing body parts or objects according to historically accurate or even imagined reconstructions of the objects at hand. The end of this obsession for complete and perfect sculptures came to … Continue reading The lure of the Incomplete, the Imperfect and the Fragmented in Art

Romans sweating is “cheating”: Roland Barthes against Hollywood

According to Roland Barthes, prominent French literary theorist and semiotician, the film Julius Caesar (1953) is full of errors. In Mankiewicz’s film all Romans have fringes not because its historically accurate, but because a fringe serves as a sign of Roman-ness. For a Frenchman like Barthes, the fringes look funny when combined with the “exotic” American “gangster-sheriffs” that star in the film. The only exception is … Continue reading Romans sweating is “cheating”: Roland Barthes against Hollywood

Nietzsche on Raphael’s Transfiguration: The Illusion of Illusion

The Birth of Tragedy is among the most beautiful works of Friedrich Nietzsche. Overflowing with influences from Hegel, Schopenhauer and Wagner, all of whom the German philosopher later rejected, the book seeks to explore the origins of Greek tragedy. It is in this work that Nietzsche elaborates on the nature of beauty and its relationship with the horrors of life, as well as the Apolline … Continue reading Nietzsche on Raphael’s Transfiguration: The Illusion of Illusion

Eyes Wide Shut: Where Kubrick met Freud and Schnitzler

Originally posted on Kvasir's Thread:
By: Antonis Ch Arthur Schnitzler back in the 19th century wrote ‘A Dream Story’ which was later brought to the big screen by Kubrick under the name Eyes Wide Shut. One of the many interesting things about Schnitzler was that his work was affected by Freud’s theories regarding the interpretation of dreams and the unconscious. This influence is more… Continue reading Eyes Wide Shut: Where Kubrick met Freud and Schnitzler

Modernism and the Classical Ideal: Ashmole’s 1932 debate with Wilenski

*cover: Lawrence Alma-Tadema, Phidias Showing the Frieze of the Parthenon to his Friends, 1868, Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery. In 1932 Bernard Ashmole delivered nine talks under the theme ‘Art in Ancient Life’. One of these talks became unexpectedly interesting, as the English archaeologist debated the prominent modernist and rather provocative Reginald Howard Wilenski. Wilenski was not just a random artist. His book ‘The Meaning of Modern … Continue reading Modernism and the Classical Ideal: Ashmole’s 1932 debate with Wilenski

Fake-News and Politically Engaged Museums-UofStir Postgraduate Conference

In May 2019, I participated in the postgraduate conference of the University of Stirling under the theme “Disruptions“. The conference was truly interdisciplinary with participants from all disciplines within the Arts and Humanities. The day was a typical Scottish (grey sky, no sun, rain) one, but not rainy enough to prevent me from doing a wee exploration of Stirling after the conference. This was my … Continue reading Fake-News and Politically Engaged Museums-UofStir Postgraduate Conference